...I no longer knew what I owned anymore. I’d fallen into a perpetual cycle of shopping and hoarding.

Since kicking off my “fashion challenge” for 2020 (read about it HERE if you don’t know what I’m referring to) I’ve been trying to decipher ways I can still blog about the latest trends and great fashion investments without feeling like I’m constantly pushing buy, buy, buy.

I’ve talked a lot in previous years about buying pieces which are versatile.  I’ve created posts styling some of favourite pieces a multitude of different ways and chatted about which are the best items of clothing to invest in.  

However, I want my wardrobe to work evenharder this year.  

I don’t just want to be able to restyle my clothes, shoes and accessories, I want to craft a concise capsule wardrobe where the items can be interchanged with each other to create a multitude of separate looks.  

At the end of last year, I had a wardrobe overflowing with clothes, shoes and accessories and I honestly felt like I was drowning in unnecessary “stuff”. While the majority (I use this word loosely as I have been susceptible to numerous impulse purchases over the years!) were bought with the intention of rewearing and restyling them, my wardrobe had got so excessive I could no longer see the wood from the trees.  What I mean by this, is I no longer knew what I owned anymore.  I’d fallen into a perpetual cycle of shopping and hoarding.  

In reality, we regularly only wear 20% of our wardrobe. This means a streamlined wardrobe, is the only way to maximise wear and enjoyment from all the pieces in your closet.  Once I’ve got my wardrobe to a place where it’s filled with clothes I wear regularly and can restyle a multitude of ways, I know I’ll have hit the wardrobe holy grail. 

I’m a fairly sentimental person, so culling my wardrobe hasn’t been an easy task. My best advice is to do a clear-out little and often.  Don’t overwhelm yourself with pressure to throw everything out in one go.  Maybe go category by category, so start with shoes or belts.  Think about the last time you wore it and if you’re going to be realistically wearing it within the next year.  As time goes on, you’ll get a much better handle on what is important to you and what can be let go of.  This will eventually make you much more ruthless.

The other tip, I’ve found really helpful in pushing me forward to create a more streamlined, harder working wardrobe, is reselling my unwanted clothes.  Seeing the pennies and pounds add up has been really motivating.  Admittedly, you’re only getting a slither of what you originally paid for them but it’s something.  Plus, it’s comforting to know your clothes and accessories are going to someone who’ll give them the love and wear they deserve.  

To date I’ve raised almost £2000 selling my unwanted items which I’m absolutely delighted with and it’s really motivated me to keep adding to the pot. I’m going to be doing individual blog posts on the different ways I’ve sold my clothes and which have been most profitable. 

I’m looking forward to sharing more of this journey on the blog. If you have gone through a similar process and have any tip, tricks or ideas on how to make your wardrobe work harder, I’d love to hear them.      

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The dress I'm wearing was kindly gifted by Femme Luxe Finery. As always all opinions remain wholly my own.

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