I don’t want to consume to the point our planet falls apart, so this year I’ve decided to set myself a challenge to help me become more considered in my purchases and whims.

Thanks to science, the media and activists around the world, we’ve become far more considerate about the way we consume and waste the likes of plastic, food, fast fashion, packaging, etc., etc.  I certainly feel guilty about my ignorance and lack of consideration in the past.  However, over the years I’ve been taking little steps to be kinder to our planet but I’m finally at a stage where I want to do more.  I no longer want to consume to the point our planet falls apart, so this year I’ve decided to set myself a challenge to become more considered in my purchases and whims.  

For 2020, I will no longer be consuming new clothes at the rate I once was. In general, I’m already pretty good at avoiding fast fashion. I hardly ever shop on the likes of Missguided, Pretty Little Thing, SheIn, etc.  Also, I’m not someone who buys a new outfit for every occasion and I’m more than happy to be seen in the same thing several times.  

However, I am guilty of over-consuming, so while I don’t buy a lot of mass-made fashion, I still like to shop. Over the years, I’ve justified my purchases as investment pieces which I will wear for years and years to come.  However, I’m at a stage where I simply don’t need any more stuff.  Also, despite my good intentions, I have been guilty of buying odd items on a whim which simply don’t get sufficient wear and this has to stop.  It’s wasteful on the planet and wasteful on my purse.  There are too many unworn, unwanted clothes out there and I simply don’t want to play my part in that anymore.  

This year I’ve decided to make a change and focus on shopping preloved fashion instead of new. I’m already such a fan of preloved shopping, so I don’t think it’s going to be an impossibly difficult transition. Thankfully over the last few years, I’ve developed a little black book of amazing dress agencies and preloved fashion stores which are always filled to the brim with incredible treasures, so I’m sure I’ll still be able to get my fashion fix. Plus, there are so many alternatives to shopping-new which I haven’t tried yet including thrifting, charity shops, swapping at wardrobes with friends, hiring clothes, etc, etc.   

The part which will be hardest for me is letting go of that sale hunter in me.  I love to find items I’ve been lusting after for months in the seasonal sales or at samples sales.  So, I’ve made myself one caveat to help with this transition.  I’m still allowing myself to purchase new pieces of clothing that I love on sale (providing I can’t find them preloved), HOWEVER, they can only be purchased using money I’ve made selling my unwanted treasures, such as clothes, accessories, beauty bits, etc.  I’ve already started selling a few bits and pieces on depop and eBay, so my fund is slowly growing.  This way I can still get that bargain hunter fix while recycling fashion at the same time. 

I’m sure there will be people who’ll think I’m cheating by allowing this exception.  Although I want to be better and more thoughtful when it comes to consuming, I don’t expect myself to be perfect straight away.  This is a step in the right direction but of course, there is more I can still do.  I hope to extend this fashion challenge further and look into doing potentially doing a “no buy year” too.  However, like anything you have to take baby steps first and I’m looking forward to sharing the journey with you on this blog.  

 

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